Make your own free website on Tripod.com





Current:

Vette News
Vette Events

The Site:

History
Years
FAQ
Pictures
Related Articles

Interact:

Search L-82.com
Sign Guestbook
View Guestbook
Message Board
Email

Links:

Chevrolet
Corvette Museum
More

 

Frequently Asked Questions


THIS PAGE IS UNDER CONSTRUCTION

What is an L-82?
RPO L-82 was introduced in 1973 as one of three engines that year, becoming the “high performance” small-block for the Corvette through 1980. It replaced the LT-1 option that was available from 1970 through 1972.

How do I determine if my Corvette is an L-82?
On 1973 through 1980 Corvettes the fifth digit of the VIN number indicates which engine was originally installed at the factory. The VIN tag is installed on the drivers side on the top of the dash panel (click here for codes). The engine block serial number should be stamped with a matching VIN designation. This stamping usually consisted of the VIN as well as the division (#1) and a model year designation. If the codes and numbers match your car is a factory original L-82.

My Corvette has L-82 emblems on it. Does that mean it's an L-82?
Not necessarily, anyone can tack on some L-82 emblems. See above to verify if your Corvette is a real L-82.

What are the differences between the base engine and the L-82?
The L-82 succeed the original LT-1. Making it's debut in 1973 with a 9.0:1 compression ratio, 2.02-inch intake/1.60-inch exhaust valves and hydraulic lifters. It was rated at 250 net horsepower at 5,200 rpm and 285 lb-ft of torque at 4,000 rpm. 

By comparison, the L-48 had an 8.5:1 compression ratio, 1.94-inch intake/1.50-inch exhaust valves and a milder camshaft. It's power rating was 190 hp at 4,400 rpm and 275 lb-ft of torque at 2,800 rpm. Compared to the L-48, the L-82 has large port cylinder heads, pushrod guideplates, a longer duration camshaft, a forged-steel crankshaft, forged aluminum pistons, moly rings, finned aluminum valve covers, a higher capacity starter and a four-bolt main block. 

Horsepower ratings of the two engines varied from year to year as Chevrolet attempted to meet changing emissions and fuel economy requirements. The L-82 horsepower ratings ranged from a high of 250 in 19'73-19'74 to a low of 205 in 19'75. In 1980, it's last year of production, the L-82 was rated at 230 horsepower. During the same time period, L-48 horsepower ranged from a low of 165 in 1975 to a high of 195 in 1974 and 1979.

What are the camshaft specs for an L-82?
The original camshaft used is a hydraulic GM Part Number 3896962 and has the following specifications: intake lift .450, exhaust lift .460, intake duration 346, and exhaust duration 360. This camshaft was used in all 1973 through 1980 L-82 Corvettes.

What does "matching numbers" mean?
The term probably originated in the Corvette restoration hobby. This term simply means all pertinent identification numbers, as well as all casting numbers and dates are correct for that specific model and pre-date the final assembly date of the car.

How do I know if my Corvette is a "matching numbers" car?
The first and most obvious number to check is the VIN number. The VIN tag is installed on the drivers side on the top of the dash panel. After validating the VIN, the next detail you should check is the vehicle dataplate. All 1973 through 1975 Corvettes had the dataplate attached to the left-hand door pillar.

Next, the engine block serial number should be stamped with a matching VIN designation. This stamping usually consisted of the VIN as well as the division (#1) and a model year designation. Other areas to check for ID numbers are the transmission and the rear axle.

If the codes and numbers match your car is a "matching numbers" car. Although restorers would probably disagree with that statement. Their assertion would be that the distributor, alternator and many other detail parts must have matching numbers and codes to be considered an original "matching numbers car. They are probably right since a car is only original once.